Bulb Archived: Murphy 2018-2019: Shultz and Anderson (2018-2019 A/R Partners)

A/R P BULB

1. How did you and your teaching partner decide to do this project?

(Please describe the context of your project, this can include influence from previous projects, context of your school, community, etc.):

Penny communicated that her class would be learning about landforms, and Gwyneth voiced that she often imagines what it would look like if we could watch time-lapse animations of mountains being formed. Gwyneth has experience teaching stop-motion animation to youth, and Penny had access to iPads at Murphy. Penny was confident that the students would enjoy learning how to animate.

2. Big Idea: Demonstrating Change in Landforms

3. Inquiry: How can time-based art practices and sculpture help teach us the ways water shapes land?

4. Grade Level: 4

5. Academic Subject(s): Science

6. Artistic Discipline(s): Sculpture, animation, video installation

7. How many years have you worked together as partners?: 1 (this is the first year)

8. Please describe what you did and what you made for this project: Students created a sculptural installation that depicts a landscape shaped by water. Students first observed and identified landforms on Google Earth. Using a stream table students predicted where they think water will travel and shape the sand. From these observations, students worked in small groups to create stop-motion animations with clay that simulate the water’s movements and resulting landforms. They simulated geological layers of rock using layers of colorful plasteline (non-hardening) clay, layered like lasagna. Then, students gently carved a little bit of clay away at a time with their fingers and tools, taking one picture after every small manipulation. Over time, they made enough pictures to create an animation. They deepened understanding by demonstrating change on Earth over time. For the final installation, the animation below played on loop on a monitor, and each clay landform was on display with vocabulary identifying each part of the landform.

Final animation of landforms.

9. How did you share your student’s learning process with your school faculty or community?

The sculptures and animations were on display for the student-led parent-teacher conference night at Murphy.

Teaching Artist Assessment:

How did you assess student arts learning?: (ex. Was it formative or summative? Was it a written, verbal or performative based assessment? Were students provided with teacher or peer feedback? Did you use a rubric or portfolio system? Etc.)

One pre-assessment involved asking the kids to draw a depiction of what it might look like to animate a landform being created:

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A response to the question: what would animating a landform look like?
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Another response to the question: what would animating a landform look like?

Another summative assessment involved, at the end of making the animations, playing back their videos, and the entire class naming each landform that was being created, purely through observing the movements and shapes of the clay.

We also passed out another assessment, described in the Teacher Assessment section below.

What were the results of the assessment? What did students learn in your class/project?

Students learned to identify landforms based on the movements and forms in their animations.

What did you learn from analyzing the student assessments that informs your Arts teaching practice?

I learned that students were generally least confident in operating the camera equipment, and were often more confused about that than the content of the project or the animation process.

Illinois Arts Learning Standards Addressed:

Anchor Standard 2: VA:Cr2.1.4

a. Explore and invent art-making techniques and approaches.

Anchor Standard 2: VA:Cr2.3.4

a. Document, describe, and represent regional constructed environments.

Anchor Standard 2: VA:Cr2.2.4

a. When making works of art, utilize and care for materials, tools, and equipment in a manner that prevents danger to oneself and others.

Anchor Standard 7: 4th VA:Re7.2.4

a. Analyze components in visual imagery that convey messages.

Teacher Assessment:

How did you assess student academic content learning?: (ex. Was it formative or summative? Was it a written, verbal or performative based assessment? Were students provided with teacher or peer feedback? Did you use a rubric or portfolio system? Etc.)

What were the results of the assessment? What did students learn in your class/project?

The assessment was given twice to the students. Because we had started our project, the first time the students responded, it was formative to see how familiar they were with the concepts we covered. The second response was at the end of our experience with the CAPE artist. The growth of the students is illustrated by the increase of positive student responses. ____

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Pre-assessment
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Post-assessment

Common Core State Standards Connections: ELA/Literacy –

W.4.7 Conduct short research projects that build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic. (4-ESS1-1)

W.4.8 Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; take notes and categorize information, and provide a list of sources. (4-ESS1-1)

W.4.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (4-ESS1-1)

By setting up, conducting, researching, investigating and reporting on the project, students will practice all of the writing standards.

Mathematics –

MP.2 Reason abstractly and quantitatively. (4-ESS1-1)

MP.4 Model with mathematics. (4-ESS1-1)

4.MD.A.1 Know relative sizes of measurement units within one system of units including km, m, cm; kg, g; lb, oz.; l, ml; hr, min, sec. Within a single system of measurement, express measurements in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit. Record measurement equivalents in a two-column table. (4-ESS1-1)

Students will measure their stream table, and compare the landforms with measurements of actual landforms in nature. Students will become familiar with measurements in centimeters and inches as they measure and compare their projects, and compare their models.

NGSS

4-ESS1-1. Identify evidence from patterns in rock formations and fossils in rock layers to support an explanation for changes in a landscape over time.

As students observe the changes in their models, they will use the data collected in their videos and measurements to explain the changes in actual landscapes over time.

Core Arts Standards: Anchor Standard 1-3 for conceptualizing, creating and refining artistic work; Anchor Standard 4 for curating and presenting work; Anchor Standard 5 for analyzing artistic work.

Students will visualize their projects, then form their works, analyzing and presenting with their peers, school community, and families.