Bulb Archived: Murphy 2018-2019 : Sera and Robbins (2018-2019 A/R Partners)

A/R P BULB

1. How did you and your teaching partner decide to do this project?

We worked together in the past and have really enjoyed our collaborations.  Murphy School has a kiln, and we wanted to make sure we put it to good use.  We decided to include science this year because CPS adopted a new science curriculum.

(Please describe the context of your project, this can include influence from previous projects, context of your school, community, etc.):

2. Big Idea: Modeling Matter

3. Inquiry: How could we replicate the elements of matter that we cannot see?

4. Grade Level: 5th grade

5. Academic Subject(s): Science, Art

6. Artistic Discipline(s):  hand building with clay; printmaking; sculpture; 2D rendering (drawing from a photo or model)

7. How many years have you worked together as partners?: 4 years

8. Please describe what you did and what you made for this project:

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A pinch pot with marbles- pre firing.

Students expressed their understandings of how matter is composed of particles by using clay and other materials. RECOGNIZING CHANGE was an essential part of this project. Students explored how matter undergoes changes in different conditions.

Students learned different clay hand building techniques. They incorporated different types of matter when firing clay pots (marbles) and tiles (coffee beans, pine needles, pasta, rice) and observed the changes that the clay and organic matter underwent in the kiln.

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Tiles before firing

A student explaining our tiles at Convergence.

We made suminagashi prints. They observed how the ink changed when touched with soapy water.Gina Robbins demonstrating the suminagashi process.

We observed the changes dry clay underwent when submerged in water.

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A students observation of a clay sculpture before submerging it in water and  after 10, 20 and 30 minutes.

After observing how marvel beads reacted with water, we constructed stress balls using balloons, water, and marvel beads.

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We looked at images of different particles and molecules and made models of them using clay.

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Students grouped their molecules for display at Convergence based on which molecules were attracted to each other.  This is group 1.
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Group 2
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Group 3
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Group 4
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Group 5 (chalk molecules)
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Group 6

9. How did you share your student’s learning process with your school faculty or community?

When our items are returned, I plan on displaying them at the Independence Branch of the Chicago Public Library.  Photos and videos of the project were shared on our school website.

Teaching Artist Assessment:

How did you assess student arts learning?: (ex. Was it formative or summative? Was it a written, verbal or performative based assessment? Were students provided with teacher or peer feedback? Did you use a rubric or portfolio system? Etc.)

The students completed a written summative self-assessment.

What were the results of the assessment? What did students learn in your class/project?

The students demonstrated retained knowledge about ceramic handbuilding and firing techniques, and recognized the interdependence between the art disciplines we explored and their science curriculum.

What did you learn from analyzing the student assessments that informs your Arts teaching practice?

That students want even more independence and agency in defining their activities.  “Open studio” exploration time should be a larger piece of future projects.

Illinois Arts Learning Standards Addressed:

Anchor Standard 1-3 for conceptualizing, creating and refining artistic work; Anchor Standard 4 for curating and presenting work; Anchor Standard 5 for analyzing artistic work.

Teacher Assessment:

How did you assess student academic content learning?: (ex. Was it formative or summative? Was it a written, verbal or performative based assessment? Were students provided with teacher or peer feedback? Did you use a rubric or portfolio system? Etc.)

In addition to asking questions throughout the project to assess student understanding  of molecules, students completed a written summative assessment.

What were the results of the assessment? What did students learn in your class/project?

Students learned that when they are  “doing CAPE, they are doing science“.  They also learned how clay can be a restrictive, yet forgiving medium of expression.  They learned that when molecules combine in different ways, they have different observable properties.

Standards Addressed: (Common Core, Next Generation Science, SEL, Etc.): 

Next Generation Science Standards Performance Expectations: 5-PS1-1; 5-PS1-2; 5-PS1-3; 5-PS1-4; 3-5-ETS1-2 

Science and Engineering Practices: Practice 1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 6; 7; 8 

Disciplinary Core Ideas: PS1.A; PS1.B; ETS1.B 

Crosscutting Concepts: Scale, Proportion, and Quantity; Energy and Matter; Patterns; Structure and Function; Cause and Effect; Stability and Change