Bulb Archived: Murphy 2018-2019: Ramirez and Robbins (2018-2019 A/R Partners)

A/R P BULB

1. How did you and your teaching partner decide to do this project? (Please describe the context of your project, this can include influence from previous projects, context of your school, community, etc.):

Murphy School is a community of learners dedicated to educating the whole child. Students are immersed in a collaborative learning environment that fosters social, emotional, and academic development with an emphasis on the Fine Arts. The educational context, as well as the success of previous CAPE partnership endeavors, informed our decision to pursue this project. 

2. Big Idea:  

Symbols and Community

3. Inquiry:  

How can we explore historical objects and artifacts using modern materials? What contemporary objects can be considered artifacts? What is the value of having shared customs and traditions?

4. Grade Level: 

Fourth

5. Academic Subject(s):  

Social Science

6. Artistic Discipline(s):  

We will construct objects and sound makers using clay and other materials; We will document our understanding and process using photography.

7. How many years have you worked together as partners?: 

This is our first year working together.

8. Please describe what you did and what you made for this project: 

After studying global artifacts, students created personal symbols, tools, and goods using modern materials. Projects included creating 2-dimensional collages of symbols, then using those symbols to create ceramic stamps and seals; constructing ceramic soundmakers, including drums and rattles; stamps and seals were used to texturize the surface of the drums and to print panels of a leather “quilt.” This learning process afforded students the opportunity to consider and explore contemporary “artifacts.” The project culminated with a “drum circle” where we did a series of call and response exercise, using both our animal rattles and drums to create different personal rhythms.  Participating in these collaborative and historic processes helped students understand culture, navigate agency and build community. 

9. How did you share your student’s learning process with your school faculty or community?

Students shared their learning process by presenting the artifacts their families, friends, and communities.

Teaching Artist Assessment:

How did you assess student arts learning?: (ex. Was it formative or summative? Was it a written, verbal or performative based assessment? Were students provided with teacher or peer feedback? Did you use a rubric or portfolio system? Etc.)

Student arts learning was regularly assessed throughout the project, and culminated with a summative self-assessment.  The assessment was designed and administered in such a way that students were provided with opportunities to engage in self reflection, formulate thoughtful observations, share valuable insight with each other, and assume ownership for their learning.

What were the results of the assessment? What did students learn in your class/project? 

Students learned about historical and contemporary ceramic practice, and learned basic techniques of handbuilding to make functional wares.  

What did you learn from analyzing the student assessments that informs your Arts teaching practice?

Illinois Arts Learning Standards Addressed: Core Arts Standards: Anchor Standard 1-3 for conceptualizing, creating and refining artistic work; Anchor Standard 4 for curating and presenting work; Anchor Standard 5 for analyzing artistic work. Standards 1-3 were met in the design, collaboration for and  creation of objects using traditional artifacts as a springboard.  Standards 4 and 5 will be met as students share their creations with each other and the larger school community and as they  curate and  develop and approach for presenting their project to CAPE and the larger community.

Teacher Assessment:

How did you assess student academic content learning?: (ex. Was it formative or summative? Was it a written, verbal or performative based assessment? Were students provided with teacher or peer feedback? Did you use a rubric or portfolio system? Etc.)

Student content learning was regularly assessed throughout the project. These assessments were formative and summative, verbal and written, and were structured to facilitate teacher and peer feedback. Assessments were designed and administered in such a way that students were provided with opportunities to engage in self reflection, formulate thoughtful observations, share valuable insight with each other, and assume ownership for their learning.

What were the results of the assessment? What did students learn in your class/project?

The results of the assessments revealed high levels of engagement, enthusiasm, and learning. Formative assessments, such as student and teacher observations and conversations, as well as summative assessments, provided insight into student learning.

This class/project facilitated student exploration of historical and contemporary artifacts and the significance of such artifacts to both the individual, as well as collective communities. Students were provided with learning opportunities that integrated the domains of art and social science. This interdisciplinary approach afforded students the opportunity formulate connections between the past and the present through different artistic endeavors and mediums.

Student projects included constructing ceramic soundmakers, including drums and rattles, ceramic stamps and seals, and printing panels for a leather quilt. This learning process afforded students the opportunity to consider and explore contemporary “artifacts.” Participating in these collaborative and historic processes helped students understand culture, navigate agency and build community. 

Standards Addressed: (Common Core, Next Generation Science, SEL, Etc.): 

Exchange and Markets

SS.EC. 2.4: Describe how goods and services are produced using human, natural, and capital resources (e.g. tools and machines). Students will study traditional and modern ways of producing and working with capital resources. Students will use clay and other sculptural materials to build tools and machines, both real and imagined.

Historical Sources and Evidence

SS.H.2.4: Using artifacts and primary sources, investigate how individuals contributed to and the founding and development of Illinois. Students will research artifacts that remain from the time of the founding and development of Illinois and consider what these items and facts say about the respective cultures.

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Students made their own animal rattles after studying images of historical animal rattles from Greece, Africa and China.
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Rattles were handbuilt from terra cotta and tiny balls of clay wrapped in paper were placed inside.  These are the rattles drying before going into the kiln.
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Students examining their finished rattles, and comparing the sounds depending on how big their clay pellets were and how thick their rattles’ walls were.
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Students built small hand drums out of terra cotta.
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They customized their drums by carving and using cylinder stamps that they made.   They painted their drum bases with colorful underglazes.
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Drums were finished in a traditional way with stretched goatskins and beaded ties.  Students explored the different ways to make sound with their drums, including shaking the beads to hit the drum head, patting it with their hands, or singing  into the neck of the drum, wherein they could feel the sound vibrating on the goat skin.