Bulb Archived: Goudy 2018-2019: Whitehouse and Stover (2018-2019 A/R Partners)

A/R P BULB

1. How did you and your teaching partner decide to do this project? (Please describe the context of your project, this can include influence from previous projects, context of your school, community, etc.):

Patty is the Engineering Lab teacher for K-6 students at Goudy, focusing on the engineering part of Goudy’s science curriculum that is aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Students in first grade are developing as engineers and learning about the engineering process.

The process includes:

  • Asking Questions about the project to learn about the constraints and criteria for the project (What materials are available? What do walls need to do? How do the materials interact?)
  • Imagining a Solution to the engineering problem at hand. This is the brainstorming portion of the project.
  • Making a Plan from the imagined solutions. A plan shows the design of the project, with materials labeled, and includes a list of the size and quantity of materials needed.
  • Creating the Sculpture using the plan. This is place where students may find out that the plan needs refining because the current design does not work as planned.
  • Revising/Improving the project until the constraints and criteria are met to a satisfactory degree. This part of the process may take several iterations, and may send the students back to any prior portion of the process.

Prior to beginning this CAPE project, first graders have used the engineering process to design mortar for walls that can withstand a “wrecking ball”: a golf ball pendulum dropped from various heights that tests the holding strength of the mortar they created. This CAPE project asked students to continue thinking about walls–but rather than breaking them down, how can walls be used to hold things, or people, together? How can they decorate the wall to represent sharing, caring, opportunity, communicating, helping?

2. Big Idea: Building walls that build community

3. Inquiry:How can walls put things together rather than keep things apart?

4. Grade Level: 1st, with high school student support

5. Academic Subject(s): Engineering

6. Artistic Discipline(s): Sculpture

7. How many years have you worked together as partners?: 5

8. Please describe what you did and what you made for this project: At Goudy Elementary, in Uptown, 75 first-grade students have been working with Engineering Lab teacher Patty Whitehouse and CAPE Teaching Artist Margy Stover to design walls that bring people together instead of keep them apart. The students have been planning and working in groups to construct small-scale models of “friendly walls” that incorporate fun and inviting features like swimming pools, trampolines, slides, and windows for waving hello and shaking hands.

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Making models of friendly walls:
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The Goudy first graders  welcomed a group of high school students from Williams Preparatory School of Medicine in Bronzeville, where Margy Stover also teaches a CAPE class with Williams Prep’s art teacher, Phil Cotton. The two schools exchanged letters about their lives and neighborhoods, and the Williams students came up to Goudy to help their young pen pals build large-scale versions of their friendly walls models.

Working in small groups, the first graders directed the “big kids” in the building of some very complex walls. Using 300 “blocks” constructed and decorated by the first graders, friendly walls were built, and friendly walls came tumbling down amidst peals of laughter. After several rounds of building, all the students headed outside to enjoy the sunny day and then eat lunch together  to continue the “community building process” before the Williams students boarded their bus back to Bronzeville.

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Explaining models: What makes the wall friendly? Like seats ..  &   question 5 – Reflecting on work of others (MAG)


..or a tunnel and a cow

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Writing letters to High School Friends
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Receiving letters from High School Friends
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Teamwork: Making boxes   (MAG)
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more boxes…
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& more boxes 
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Until next class… Ready to put-boxes-away-parade   (MAG)
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What are friendly images? Making the boxes look friendly.
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Working together: What are friendly images? 
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Planets!!
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A box dedicated to High School Friends!
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Hearts, fire, a cupcake and a purple tree – for so many boxes – there has to be so many ideas!
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And more ideas!
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Building together wth High School Friends!!   (MAG)
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 (MAG)
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 (MAG)

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(MAG)

Asked about the experience later, the Goudy students described how much fun they had with their new high school friends.

“It was super fun and we used teamwork. Our walls made happiness come inside, not bad things, and we were so happy!” –Aaron, 1st grade

The value of this project wasn’t only in getting to pal around with older kids, though. Many of the first graders were left with strong impressions about the role of walls in their own and others’ lives:

“People who build mean walls, their hearts are black and broken, and they hurt other people’s feelings. But if you build nice walls it can help other people feel happy and make new friends.” 

–Pranisha, 1st grade

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9. How did you share your student’s learning process with your school faculty or community?

The Goudy first graders  welcomed the high school students from Williams Preparatory School of Medicine in Bronzeville to help them build large-scale versions of their friendly walls models. Also invited were parents of the 1st graders, the Principal and Assistant Principal at Goudy, Alderman Osterman, 1st grade teachers, the drama teacher and 50 students from the Drama club, who performed for the high schools students prior to the wall building part of the morning. 

Teaching Artist Assessment:

How did you assess student arts learning?: (ex. Was it formative or summative? Was it a written, verbal or performative based assessment? Were students provided with teacher or peer feedback? Did you use a rubric or portfolio system? Etc.)

  • Formative: This is built into the Engineering Design Process. If the wall building does not meet the selected criteria, the students revise and improve until it does.
  • Summative: When the walls are completed, students can critique them based on whether they met the requirements of the building process as well as the artistic and engineering merits, similar to the critiques that have been used in prior projects.

What were the results of the assessment? What did students learn in your class/project?

What did you learn from analyzing the student assessments that informs your Arts teaching practice?

Illinois Arts Learning Standards Addressed:

Teacher Assessment:

How did you assess student academic content learning?: (ex. Was it formative or summative? Was it a written, verbal or performative based assessment? Were students provided with teacher or peer feedback? Did you use a rubric or portfolio system? Etc.) 

  • Formative: This is built into the Engineering Design Process. If the wall building does not meet the selected criteria, the students revise and improve until it does.
  • Summative: When the walls are completed, students can critique them based on whether they met the requirements of the building process as well as the artistic and engineering merits, similar to the critiques that have been used in prior projects.

What were the results of the assessment? What did students learn in your class/project?

Standards Addressed: (Common Core, Next Generation Science, SEL, Etc.): 

The following are the Performance Expectations for the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) for Science and Engineering  that will be addressed through this unit:

3-5-ETS1-1.

Define a simple design problem reflecting a need or a want that includes specified criteria for success and constraints on materials, time, or cost.

3-5-ETS1-2.

Generate and compare multiple possible solutions to a problem based on how well each is likely to meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.

3-5-ETS1-3.

Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved.

The following are the Arts Standards that were addressed:

1. Understanding and applying media, techniques, and processes

2. Using knowledge of structures and functions

3. Choosing and evaluating a range of subject matter, symbols, and ideas (students understand how their formal choices are connected to their concept and that their art represents bigger ideas)Shari

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Sharing ideas about imagery (space) and materials (FOIL!)  (MAG)  

5. Reflecting upon and assessing the characteristics and merits of their work and the work of others

see video of Patty and class above and To note: Michelle also has great videos about one group making a robot / “wall” .. that is all about the robot.. unfortunately too long of a video 

6. Making connections between visual arts and other disciplines

The value of this project wasn’t only in getting to pal around with older kids, though. Many of the first graders were left with strong impressions about the role of walls in their own and others’ lives:

“People who build mean walls, their hearts are black and broken, and they hurt other people’s feelings. But if you build nice walls it can help other people feel happy and make new friends.”

–Pranisha, 1st grade