Bulb Archived: Foster Park ATLAS 2015-2018: Washington (Year 2, 2016-2017)

School Name: Foster Park Fine & Performing Arts Magnet Cluster School Teacher Name: Lachelle R. Washington 

Section I: Arts Integration – Documentation.  

Please upload documentation from your project.  Please include a variety of media forms for your documentation.   

1. Documentation should not only provide a narrative, or story, of your project, but should also provide evidence of students’ engagement in the unit inquiry.

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Students engage 1st graders in there narrative. (1st graders spell out FINE ART using fine motor skills).

2. Through your documentation, please provide student artifacts that depict the range of work completed.  For example, what were the various ways in which students responded to various aspects of the project?

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Students incorporate literacy as they use technology to engage in using photography (value) to explore the importance of the Fine Arts.

Section I: Arts Integration – Inquiry

3. What is your Inquiry Question for your ATLAS curriculum unit?  What big ideas does this inquiry question address, and why do you think the question successfully addresses these?

What amount of tonal value is needed to make this work reflect realism?  Artist demonstrate how tools/technologies and processes are used to create visual arts. Creating , demonstrating  knowledge and skills to create visual works of art using manipulation, eye- hand coordination and imagination. Acquire skills to produce visual art. Create their own artwork, become more creative.  

4. How did student research help them to engage more deeply with the unit inquiry question? Explain how your students conducted research for their ATLAS project, and how that research opened up avenues for further inquiry.

CCSS: R2, R3, VA1: Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work. VA3: Refine and complete artistic work. VA7: Perceive and analyze artistic work. Do Now: How do artists grow and become accomplished in art forms? I do: Print copies of the “Graphic Organizer: Ansel Adams” skills sheet, Invite students to observe the photographs featured in the article. Ask: What similarities do you see in these images? What techniques did Ansel Adams use for each? (Answers will vary but should refer specifically to the text and images.) 3. Share the following background information with the class: Adams was an active member of the Sierra Club for most of his professional life. The club, which began as a recreational, educational, and conservationist group focused on California’s Sierra Nevada region, expanded and became an influential national organization that continues to operate today. Adams used his photography to promote environmental causes in conjunction with the club’s publications. He also received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1980 for “his efforts to preserve this country’s wild and scenic areas, both on film and on earth.” Ask: Based on this information and the information in the article, how did Adams’s images promote conservationist goals? (Answers will vary but may mention Adams’s work for the Secretary of the Interior and his dedication to documenting remote locations so all people can enjoy them.) We do: As a class, read “Into the Wild.” Invite students to observe the photographs featured in the article. Ask: What similarities do you see in these images? What techniques did Ansel Adams use for each? (Answers will vary but should refer specifically to the text and images.) You do: Students observe the photographs featured in the article. DISCUSSION: How did Adams’s early experiences influence his photography? (He spent time in museums and exhibitions, and explored San Francisco and the natural areas near his home. He traveled to Yosemite as a teenager and began taking photographs there. These early experiences provided the foundation for a lifelong creative practice and respect for nature.) In his photograph of Half Dome, how does Adams capture the landscape “in terms of its expressive-emotional quality”? (Adams worked to capture how the scene felt rather than how it appeared. He used a filter to adjust the light, deepening the shadows and emphasizing highlights.) • How does Adams use value in the works on pages 4-5? (In Monolith, the Face of Half Dome, Yosemite National Park, Adams used a filter to darken the sky and brighten the snow. In Denali and Wonder Lake, Denali National Park, Alaska, he juxtaposed the shadowed hills with the snow-covered mountain. In Monument Valley, Utah, the variation in value emphasizes the texture on the rock formations.)

5. Describe how the unit inquiry opens up avenues for interdisciplinary connections between the arts and academic content. How did arts processes and/or research practices facilitate students’ understanding of the academic topics addressed in the inquiry question?

CCSS: R4, W1, VA1: Generate artistic ideas and work. VA2: Organize and develop artistic ideas and work. VA7: Perceive and analyze artistic work. Do Now: How do artists work? I do: Review students’ notes on their “Graphic Organizer: Ansel Adams” skills sheets. On your computer or interactive whiteboard, preload the slide show “Group f.64,” available at scholastic.com/art. Project the “Group f.64” slide show. Ask: How did the Group f.64 artists create straight photographs? (Answers will vary but should describe the various techniques the artists employed.) We do: Have students read the introduction to “Straight Photography.” Ask: How did Adams define straight photography? (The creation of “photographs that looked like photographs, not like imitations of other art forms.”) Have students read the rest of the article. Ask: How did Adams create expressive images through straight photography? (Answers will vary but should refer to the ways Adams manipulated the camera settings, his use of filters, and his compositions.) Invite students to record their notes in their “Graphic Organizer: Ansel Adams” skills sheets. You do: Invite students to record their notes in their “Graphic Organizer: Ansel Adams” skills sheets. DISCUSSION: Why did Adams pursue straight photography? (Unlike some other artists, Adams did not want to paint on or otherwise alter his images. He wanted to express what he observed in a literal way.) How does Adams use highlights and shadows in Grass in Rain, Glacier Bay National Monument, Alaska? (Answers will vary but should refer to the use of light to emphasize the shape of each blade of grass.) • What effect does cropping have in the two images on page 7? (In Morning Glories, Massachusetts, Adams draws attention to the texture of the petals and leaves; in Silver Sword Plant in the Crater of Haleakalā, Haleakalā National Park, Hawaii, he brings focus to the pattern in a small part of a vast landscape.) Closure: STOP time is up, put all materials away, put assignment in center table basket Assessment: Have students complete the “Write About Art” box on page 7. “WRITE ABOUT ART” RUBRIC 4 Student writes a clear, well-considered paragraph comparing and contrasting an image from this article with an image from the article on pages 4-5. 3 Student writes a clear paragraph comparing and contrasting an image from this article with an image from the article on pages 4-5. 2 Student struggles to write a paragraph comparing and contrasting an image from this article with an image from the article on pages 4-5 1 Student writes a paragraph that does not adequately compare and contrast an image from this article with an image from the article on pages 4-5.

6. How did the curriculum evolve based on the unit inquiry process? 

CCSS: R1, R3, VA3: Refine and complete artistic work. VA8: Interpret intent and meaning in artistic work. VA10: Synthesize knowledge and experiences to make art. Do Now: How does making art attune people to their surroundings? I do: Review students’ notes from their “Graphic Organizer: Ansel Adams” skills sheets. Read “Intriguing Isolation” and observe the image Roots, Foster Gardens, Honolulu. Ask: How did Adams bring attention to the abstract forms in this image? (Adams removed the traditional context around the roots and used texture and light to draw attention to the roots’ shapes.). We do: As a class, read the opening paragraph and the “Shifting Shapes” section of “Exploring Abstraction.” Discuss the image Sand Dune, Sunrise, Death Valley, California. Ask: How did Adams bring attention to the abstract forms in this image? (The range of values between the highlights and shadows on the dunes emphasizes the forms and textures in the work.) You do: students read “Dramatic Diagonals” and observe the image Sand Fence near Keeler, California. Ask: How did Adams create a sense of movement in this image? (Adams contrasted the light fence posts with the dark sand, which creates a sense of movement, like an optical illusion. He also used the fence as a leading line, pulling the viewer’s eye deeper into the scene.) Students record their findings in their “Graphic Organizer: Ansel Adams” skills sheets. DISCUSSION: In what ways does Adams “look at the world beyond the lens?” (Adams spent a great deal of time observing the natural spaces around him and translating them onto film.) How does Adams use texture in these images? (Answers will vary but should mention the way Adams introduces textures in each of the images.) Compare the images in this article with the images from the previous article on pages 6-7. What similarities do you notice? (Answers will vary but may mention the use of cropping and an emphasis on value, form, and texture.)

Section I: Arts Integration – Create Works

7. How did students self-direct while creating their artistic work during the ATLAS project?   Please provide any examples for the ways in which students made their own aesthetic choices and direction for creating their artwork.   Examples might include but are not limited to:  how did students make choices about the use of materials, how did they decide what they wanted to communicate, how did they make decisions about how to present work?

CCSS: R7, R9, VA2: Develop artistic work. VA8: Interpret intent and meaning in artistic work. VA11: Relate artistic works with cultural and historical context to deepen understanding. Do Now: How does knowing and using visual art vocabularies help us understand and interpret works of art? I do: Divide students into five groups, with each group focusing on one of the featured artists. Ask: What techniques does the artist employ? How does he or she present images to the viewer? (Answers will vary.) Lead a discussion about photography during Adams’s life and today. Encourage students to consider the works in the “Group f.64” slide show as well as those in the magazine. Ask: What similarities do you see among Adams’s photographs, those by his peers, and those on pages 10-11? (Answers will vary but may mention the concept of photography as fine art and as a vehicle to convey an idea.) We do: Divide students into five groups, with each group focusing on one of the featured artists. Ask: What techniques does the artist employ? How does he or she present images to the viewer? (Answers will vary.) Lead a discussion about photography during Adams’s life and today. You do: Have students take turns sharing their findings with the class. DISCUSSION: In the 19th century, many artists painted on their photographs to make them look like paintings. Do you think that Richter over paints his photographs for the same reason? Why or why not? (Answers will vary but should refer to the images and the text on pages 6-7 and 10.) How does Julien present a narrative in his Yishan Island, Voyage? (The artist uses his subject and composition to convey mystery and a sense of movement.) Compare Untitled (Sherman) with Untitled (Weems). How are these works similar? (Answers will vary but may mention the artists’ use of the self-portrait and the focus on identity.)

8. Please explain what opportunities the students had to reflect on their experiences and react to the work of their peers.

The Daily Art Warm Up is one of the greatest moments of engagement during a lesson because students are focused and tend to question each other on their observation of artwork and the results of their observation. Discussing artwork in class helps students to see how someone who observed the same artwork can see something different, allowing reluctant students to actively participate in discussion, students who may have otherwise been afraid to state aloud. Also, asking questions such as based on observing the two pieces of art work what do these artist have in common?, How are they alike?, How are they different?, etc. questioning and discussion helps students to visualize another perception to strengthen observational skills. During the Daily Art Warm Up, students turn and talk discussing the artwork. Students are able to support their observation, allowing others to view through the speakers’ eye the support provided, allowed students to understand individual observations. The greatest intellectual engagement was during the discussion one of my students responded using knowledge from previous skills and lessons. Also, I like that in my classroom I am creating an environment in which students are able to discuss and be actively engaged, and creating artwork.

9. How did the students’ artifacts from various stages of the ATLAS Unit impact your teaching practice? Please provide artifacts that exemplify your points.  What did you learn about your teaching practice from looking at these artifacts?

Discussing artwork in class helps students to see how someone who observed the same artwork can see something different, allowing reluctant students to actively participate in discussion, students who may have otherwise been afraid to state aloud. I learned that my teaching is not in vain, I am creating an environment in which students are able to discuss and be actively engaged, and creating artwork.

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10. Describe how the students’ work was shared in the school or publicly. Why was this an important part of this unit?

Students work is hung throughout the school, on bulletin boards, student art work is hung in the main office, in the principal and assistant principal’s office, there is display cabinet outside my office where student work is displayed, displaying student work is important because it builds self esteem, it encourages students to work toward their potential. Students work was also shared during the Fine Arts Festival. 

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Fine Art Festival Program (front)
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Fine Art Festival Program (back)

Section I: Arts Integration – Collaboration

11. How did students collaborate at different stages of the project? Examples might include but are not limited to:   did the students research together, did they create together, did they critique together, did they present together? 

The Daily Art Warm Up is one of the greatest moments of engagement during a lesson because students are focused and tend to question each other on their observation of artwork and the results of their observation. Discussing artwork in class helps students to see how someone who observed the same artwork can see something different, allowing reluctant students to actively participate in discussion, students who may have otherwise been afraid to state aloud. Also, asking questions such as based on observing your partners artwork compared to yours what does this artwork have in common?, How are they alike?, How are they different?, etc. questioning and discussion helps students to visualize another perception to strengthen observational skills. During the Daily Art Warm Up, students turn and talk discussing the artwork. Students are able to support their observation, allowing others to view through the speakers’ eye the support provided, allowed students to understand individual observations. The greatest intellectual engagement was during the discussion one of my students responded using knowledge from previous skills and lessons. Also, I like that in my classroom I am creating an environment in which students are able to discuss and be actively engaged, while creating artwork.

12. In what ways did you collaborate with the students for this unit.  How did the students impact the way in which the curriculum was implemented? For example, how did students help you plan, develop, and/or implement the curriculum?

Students are required to have a sketchbook/notebook/spiral to use during visual art class, this book is to be used to record objectives (in their own words) notes, vocabulary, and sketches, to help students prepare for activities, projects, and assessments. I use observation as one means of assessment this allows me to ensure that all students are on task. I also, walk around to do a quick check of student notes (students take notes on my lecture, power points, and/or videos in class) this allows me to check for understanding, (is objective restated, is vocabulary listed, are there notes and sketches). Small groups are also used as a tool for assessing; students have to show their work in groups using chart paper, markers and collaborative discussion in their groups. I can tell by the progress of the artwork that was completed and displayed throughout the school students are progressing in my art class. The students were able to identify techniques and processes for creating various artworks.

13. How did you collaborate with other teachers in your school to plan and/or implement the unit? 

Through my collaboration with the specialist I know that some students need additional time on task, pre-cut or pre-printed activities to ensure that students stay on task, restatement of directions with the teacher or peer buddy to make sure students understands the specific directions and a peer buddy to work with if he/she has additional questions or concerns. Enrichment occurs when students who are mastering visual art tasks are usually group leaders and/or they assist other struggling students.

Section II: Technology Integration

14. What was your process for selecting this form of digital media technology? Why did you think this form of digital media technology would be ideal for student learning? 

Throughout the Atlas PDs, I began putting together this unit, I have done units on photography prior to Atlas, I then began to include digital media, students were given digital cameras, they were instructed to take  photos of scenes, objects and or both. Upon completion we print out the photos in black and white, being mindful that we are working with values. We the choose a photo and crop out section, then explain the cropped section in terms of values. students are then given iPads they combine their photos and explanations to create i movies. Since most classrooms have varied learning styles, I diligently strive to make a practice of being aware and prepared to address all the learning needs of my students. These needs are met through the use of technology: iPad’s, power point, you tube videos, online art work, and graphic organizers. Students are engaged daily in a do now, mini lesson, whole/guided group, small group and/or written activities. I make a consistent effort

15. How did students use digital media technology to direct their own learning? Provide artifacts to show evidence of how students used the technology to direct their own learning.  Examples might include but are not limited to: making choices about technologies to use, using technology to facilitate experimentation, using technology as a research tool, to express themselves artistically, and/or to make meaning of their experiences. 

16. How did you use technology to enhance the learning environment for both you as a teacher and for the students?

The students  and I  were able to explore various technology and  identify techniques and processes for creating various artworks. 

17. In what ways do your chosen technology resources align with your goals and outcomes for student learning? Looking back at the unit, how did the technology meet, not meet or exceed your expectations for facilitating student outcomes. 

Throughout the Atlas PDs, I began putting together this unit, I have done units on photography prior to Atlas, I then began to include digital media, students were given digital cameras, they were instructed to take photos of scenes, objects and or both. Upon completion we print out the photos in black and white, being mindful that we are working with values. We the choose a photo and crop out section, then explain the cropped section in terms of values. students are then given iPads they combine their photos and explanations to create i movies. Since most classrooms have varied learning styles, I diligently strive to make a practice of being aware and prepared to address all the learning needs of my students. These needs are met through the use of technology: iPad’s, power point, you tube videos, online art work, and graphic organizers. Students are engaged daily in a do now, mini lesson, whole/guided group, small group and/or written activities. I make a consistent effort

18. How did the use of technology contribute to students’ application of higher order thinking skills?  Examples of student higher order thinking skills include meta cognition, self-reflection, analysis, and application of knowledge or skills.

The students and I were able to explore various technology and identify techniques and processes for creating various artworks.

19. How did the use of technology drive student creative artistic expression? Please provide student artifacts that exemplify how technology supported their artistic expression. 

20. How did the integration of digital media technology impact your teaching practice?

The integration of digital media technology impacts my teaching practices in that it provides a visual or shall I say a life like visual, technology allows for digital artwork manipulation. Technology allows students to be creative, to explore.