Bulb Archived: Foster Park ATLAS 2015-2018: Washington (Year 1, 2015-2016)

ATLAS Survey Y1

School Name:

 Foster Park Fine & Performing Art Magnet Cluster School

Teacher Name:

Ms. Lachelle  R.  Washington

Section I: Arts Integration – Documentation.  

Please upload documentation from your project.  Please include a variety of media forms for your documentation.  For example,

 

1. Documentation should not only provide a narrative, or story, of your project, but should also provide evidence of students’ engagement in the unit inquiry.

Unit Description: introduce the students to the basic art elements and principles of design. Students will use a variety of art media and techniques whereby they will learn to make critical judgments about art. Students will also develop an understanding and appreciation of art influences from other times and cultures. This course is a prerequisite for further study. Visual Art is designed to build upon and increase the students’ knowledge of the Art elements and principles of design. Students will also continue to develop and explore through creative experiences and exposure to a variety of materials and techniques. Their understanding and appreciation of Art students will become stronger and continue to build.

Students will analyze and evaluate the effective use of the elements, principles and expressive qualities in a composition. Demonstrate knowledge and skills that communicate clear and focused ideas based on planning, research, and problem solving. Acquire skills to produce visual art. Learn to use mediums, tools and technologies. Learn to shape ideas and emotions into visual art. Create their own artwork, become more imaginative. Creating, demonstrating knowledge and skills to create visual works of art using manipulation, eye-hand coordination and imagination.

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Student work based on the artist Faith Ringgold, and the book If People Could Fly

2. Through your documentation, please provide student artifacts that depict the range of work completed.  For example, what were the various ways in which students responded to various aspects of the project?  

Introduce narrative art by discussing Faith Ringgold’s story quilts. Ask students to consider how she incorporates a narrative into a single artwork. (Tar Beach represents multiple scenes simultaneously; The Sunflower Quilting Bee at Arles includes historical figures from different eras and references varying themes.) 2. Discuss the ways in which Ringgold blends fiction and nonfiction narrative. Ask: How does Ringgold enhance and embellish her narrative through the inclusion of fantasy or imagined elements? (Answers will vary but should reference specific details from the artworks and text.) 3. Have students take notes in their “Narrative Artists” skills sheet.

Section I: Arts Integration – Inquiry

3. What is your Inquiry Question for your ATLAS curriculum unit?  What big ideas does this inquiry question address, and why do you think the question successfully addresses these?  

Students will use a variety of art media and techniques whereby they will learn to make critical judgments about art. Students will also develop an understanding and appreciation of art influences from other times and cultures.

4. How did student research help them to engage more deeply with the unit inquiry question? Explain how your students conducted research for their ATLAS project, and how that research opened up avenues for further inquiry. 

 students work in pairs, studying the two works of art, one student in each pair to take notes on the personal-narrative details included in Camas para Sueños and Empanadas, while the other takes notes on the universal aspects of the works. students share their findings with the class. Invite two students to record the class’s observations, students to record their findings in their “Narrative Artists” skills sheets. students compare and contrast their notes on Garza with their notes on Ringgold. Ask: Do the artists use similar techniques to portray stories? In what ways do their methods differ?

5. Describe how the unit inquiry opens up avenues for interdisciplinary connections between the arts and academic content. How did arts processes and/or research practices facilitate students’ understanding of the academic topics addressed in the inquiry question? 

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tudents work in pairs, studying the two works on pages 6-7. Ask one student in each pair to take notes on the personal-narrative details included in Camas para Sueños and Empanadas, while the other takes notes on the universal aspects of the works. 2. Have students share their findings with the class. Invite two students to record the class’s observations. 3. Ask students to record their findings in their “Narrative Artists” skills sheets. 4. Have students compare and contrast their notes on Garza with their notes on Ringgold. Ask: Do the artists use similar techniques to portray stories? In what ways do their methods differ?

6. How did the curriculum evolve based on the unit inquiry process? 

Tar Beach by Faith Ringgold. Keywords: Birds Eye View, Collage, Color, Composition, Illustrate, Landscape, Mood Activity: Class Quilt

Keywords Defined:

• Birds Eye View – a scene shown from high up in the air as a bird in flight might see it

• Collage – work of art created by gluing bits of paper, fabric, scraps, photographs or other materials to a flat surface

• Color – an element of art. The hue, value, and intensity of an object.

• Composition – arrangement or design of elements of an artwork to achieve balance, contrast, rhythm, emphasis and unity to make an effective expression of an artists’ idea.

• Illustrate – to create designs and pictures for books or magazines to explain or show what happens in a story.

• Landscape – a painting or drawing showing a scene from nature, often including mountains, trees, rivers, fields and other outdoor scenery.

• Mood – the feeling or emotion suggested or created in the viewer by a work of art

Important lesson: What is a quilt? Quilting is an art form. African-American women are credited with the beginning of quilt-making in America. Making quilts was part of their duties as slaves and they made them for the plantation owner’s family. Quilts were part of Faith Ringgold’s family tradition.

Meet the Artist:

• Faith Ringgold was born in Harlem, N.Y. in 1930. She grew up during the time of the Great Depression. As a child she had asthma so she didn’t go to school until 2nd grade.

• Her mother taught her at home and took her to museums. She gave Faith paper & crayons to draw and bits of cloth, needle and thread to make little things. Her mother taught her to sew.

• While she was at college, Faith had a professor who didn’t like her drawings and told her that he didn’t think that she would be an artist.

• Faith Ringgold began her artistic career more than 35 years ago as a painter. Today, she is best known for her painted story quilts – art that combines painting, quilted fabric and storytelling. When she started out, there were hardly any galleries that would show the work of black women.

• She has exhibited all over the world and has permanent collections in many museums in New York

Section I: Arts Integration – Create Works

7. How did students self-direct while creating their artistic work during the ATLAS project?   Please provide any examples for the ways in which students made their own aesthetic choices and direction for creating their artwork.   Examples might include but are not limited to:  how did students make choices about the use of materials, how did they decide what they wanted to communicate, how did they make decisions about how to present work?

The Daily Art Warm Up is one of the greatest moments of engagement during a lesson because students are focused and tend to question each other on their observation of artwork and the results of their observation. Discussing artwork in class helps students to see how someone who observed the same artwork can see something different, allowing reluctant students to actively participate in discussion, students who may have otherwise been afraid to state aloud. Also, asking questions such as based on observing the two pieces of art work what do these artist have in common?, How are they alike?, How are they different?, etc. questioning and discussion helps students to visualize another perception to strengthen observational skills. During the Daily Art Warm Up, students turn and talk discussing the artwork. Students are able to support their observation, allowing others to view through the speakers’ eye the support provided, allowed students to understand individual observations. The greatest intellectual engagement was during the discussion one of my students responded using knowledge from previous skills and lessons. Also, I like that in my classroom I am creating an environment in which students are able to discuss and be actively engaged, and creating artwork.        

 

8. Please explain what opportunities the students had to reflect on their experiences and react to the work of their peers.

The Daily Art Warm Up is one of the greatest moments of engagement during a lesson because students are focused and tend to question each other on their observation of artwork and the results of their observation. Discussing artwork in class helps students to see how someone who observed the same artwork can see something different, allowing reluctant students to actively participate in discussion, students who may have otherwise been afraid to state aloud. Also, asking questions such as based on observing the two pieces of art work what do these artist have in common?, How are they alike?, How are they different?, etc. questioning and discussion helps students to visualize another perception to strengthen observational skills. During the Daily Art Warm Up, students turn and talk discussing the artwork. Students are able to support their observation, allowing others to view through the speakers’ eye the support provided, allowed students to understand individual observations. The greatest intellectual engagement was during the discussion one of my students responded using knowledge from previous skills and lessons. Also, I like that in my classroom I am creating an environment in which students are able to discuss and be actively engaged, and creating artwork.        

9. How did the students’ artifacts from various stages of the ATLAS Unit impact your teaching practice? Please provide artifacts that exemplify your points.  What did you learn about your teaching practice from looking at these artifacts?

All student artifacts are on my classroom desk top (note: will download later today)

10. Describe how the students’ work was shared in the school or publicly. Why was this an important part of this unit? Students work is hung throughout the school, on bulletin boards, student art work is hung in the main office, in the principal and assistant principal’s office, there is display cabinet outside my office where student work is displayed, displaying student work is important because it builds self esteem, it encourages students to work toward their potential.

Section I: Arts Integration – Collaboration

11. How did students collaborate at different stages of the project? Examples might include but are not limited to:   did the students research together, did they create together, did they critique together, did they present together? 

The Daily Art Warm Up is one of the greatest moments of engagement during a lesson because students are focused and tend to question each other on their observation of artwork and the results of their observation. Discussing artwork in class helps students to see how someone who observed the same artwork can see something different, allowing reluctant students to actively participate in discussion, students who may have otherwise been afraid to state aloud. Also, asking questions such as based on observing your partners artwork compared to yours what does this artwork have in common?, How are they alike?, How are they different?, etc. questioning and discussion helps students to visualize another perception to strengthen observational skills. During the Daily Art Warm Up, students turn and talk discussing the artwork. Students are able to support their observation, allowing others to view through the speakers’ eye the support provided, allowed students to understand individual observations. The greatest intellectual engagement was during the discussion one of my students responded using knowledge from previous skills and lessons. Also, I like that in my classroom I am creating an environment in which students are able to discuss and be actively engaged, while creating artwork.        

12. In what ways did you collaborate with the students for this unit.  How did the students impact the way in which the curriculum was implemented? For example, how did students help you plan, develop, and/or implement the curriculum

Students are required to have a sketchbook/notebook/spiral to use during visual art class, this book is to be used to record objectives (in their own words) notes, vocabulary, and sketches, to help students prepare for activities, projects, and assessments. I use observation as one means of assessment this allows me to ensure that all students are on task. I also, walk around to do a quick check of student notes (students take notes on my lecture, power points, and/or videos in class) this allows me to check for understanding, (is objective restated, is vocabulary listed, are there notes and sketches). Small groups are also used as a tool for assessing; students have to show their work in groups using chart paper, markers and collaborative discussion in their groups. I can tell by the progress of the artwork that was completed and displayed throughout the school students are progressing in my art class. The students were able to identify techniques and processes for creating various artworks.    

13. How did you collaborate with other teachers in your school to plan and/or implement the unit?

Through my collaboration with the specialist I know that some students need additional time on task, pre-cut or pre-printed activities to ensure that students stay on task, restatement of directions with the teacher or peer buddy to make sure students understands the specific directions and a peer buddy to work with if he/she has additional questions or concerns. Enrichment occurs when students who are mastering visual art tasks are usually group leaders and/or they assist other struggling students. 

Section II: Technology Integration

14. What was your process for selecting this form of digital media technology? Why did you think this form of digital media technology would be ideal for student learning? 

Since most classrooms have varied learning styles, I diligently strive to make a practice of being aware and prepared to address all the learning needs of my students. These needs are met through the use of technology: iPads,  power point, you tube videos, online art work, and graphic organizers. Students are engaged daily in a do now, mini lesson, whole/guided group, small group and/or written activities. I make a consistent effort

15. How did students use digital media technology to direct their own learning? Provide artifacts to show evidence of how students used the technology to direct their own learning.  Examples might include but are not limited to: making choices about technologies to use, using technology to facilitate experimentation, using technology as a research tool, to express themselves artistically, and/or to make meaning of their experiences. 

Technology is used to include my visual learners, auditory learner’s use note taking, creating drawings, tangible practices. On a regular basis students are engaged in a daily do warm up (Do Now) with some visual component, small group with hands on or written activity, and an assessment to ensure student understands. I strive to have in place strategies for struggling students at this point is when intervention and/or regrouping takes place in the form of small group activities with group leaders to help struggling students understand. I try to structure my lessons and pacing based on visual art performance task and my knowledge of what students should know in the area of visual art from the prior assessments. My lesson plans/unit plans are constructed to include diverse learner accommodations and modifications for that specific population of students. I collaborate with my diverse learner specialist early on to discuss what students need for my visual art classroom; there are several diverse learners who receive resources

16. How did you use technology to enhance the learning environment for both you as a teacher and for the students?

Technology is used to include my visual learners, auditory learner’s use note taking, creating drawings, tangible practices. On a regular basis students are engaged in a daily do warm up (Do Now) with some visual component, small group with hands on or written activity, and an assessment to ensure student understands. I strive to have in place strategies for struggling students at this point is when intervention and/or regrouping takes place in the form of small group activities with group leaders to help struggling students understand. I try to structure my lessons and pacing based on visual art performance task and my knowledge of what students should know in the area of visual art from the prior assessments. My lesson plans/unit plans are constructed to include diverse learner accommodations and modifications for that specific population of students. I collaborate with my diverse learner specialist early on to discuss what students need for my visual art classroom; there are several diverse learners who receive resources. Through my collaboration with the specialist I know that some students need additional time on task, pre-cut or pre-printed activities to ensure that students stay on task, restatement of directions with the teacher or peer buddy to make sure students understands the specific directions and a peer buddy to work with if he has additional questions or concerns. Enrichment occurs when students who are mastering visual art tasks are usually group leaders and/or they assist other struggling students. 

17. In what ways do your chosen technology resources align with your goals and outcomes for student learning? Looking back at the unit, how did the technology meet, not meet or exceed your expectations for facilitating student outcomes. 

Technology meet,  expectations for facilitating student outcomes.  My visual learners, auditory learner’s use note taking, creating drawings, tangible practices. On a regular basis students are engaged in a daily do warm up (Do Now) with some visual component, small group with hands on or written activity, and an assessment to ensure student understands. I strive to have in place strategies for struggling students at this point is when intervention and/or regrouping takes place in the form of small group activities with group leaders to help struggling students understand. I try to structure my lessons and pacing based on visual art performance task and my knowledge of what students should know in the area of visual art from the prior assessments.

18. How did the use of technology contribute to students’ application of higher order thinking skills?  Examples of student higher order thinking skills include metacognition, self-reflection, analysis, and application of knowledge or skills.

Since most classrooms have varied learning styles, I diligently strive to make a practice of being aware and prepared to address all the learning needs of my students. These needs are met through the use of technology: power point, you tube videos, online art work, and graphic organizers. Students are engaged daily in a do now, mini lesson, whole/guided group, small group and/or written activities. I make a consistent effort

to revise and/or regroup to ensure that all students get the best visual art experience. A diligent effort is made to include all learners. Technology is used to include my visual learners, auditory learner’s use note taking, creating drawings, tangible practices. On a regular basis students are engaged in a daily do warm up (Do Now) with some visual component, small group with hands on or written activity, and an assessment to ensure student understands. I strive to have in place strategies for struggling students at this point is when intervention and/or regrouping takes place in the form of small group activities with group leaders to help struggling students understand. I try to structure my lessons and pacing based on visual art performance task and my knowledge of what students should know in the area of visual art from the prior assessments. My lesson plans/unit plans are constructed to include diverse learner accommodations and modifications for that specific population of students. I collaborate with my diverse learner specialist early on to discuss what students need for my visual art classroom; there are several diverse learners who receive resources. Through my collaboration with the specialist I know that some students need additional time on task, pre-cut or pre-printed activities to ensure that students stay on task, restatement of directions with the teacher or peer buddy to make sure students understands the specific directions and a peer buddy to work with if he has additional questions or concerns. Enrichment occurs when students who are mastering visual art tasks are usually group leaders and/or they assist other struggling students. 

19. How did the use of technology drive student creative artistic expression? Please provide student artifacts that exemplify how technology supported their artistic expression. 

All student artifacts are on my classroom desk top (note: will download later today)

20. How did the integration of digital media technology impact your teaching practice?

The integration of digital media technology impacts my teaching practices in that it provides a visual or shall I say a life like visual, technology allows for digital artwork manipulation. Technology allows students to be creative, to explore.