Bulb Archived: Daley 2018-2019: Watson and Perez (2018-2019 A/R Partners)

A/R P BULB

1. How did you and your teaching partner decide to do this project? (Please describe the context of your project, this can include influence from previous projects, context of your school, community, etc.):

Our classroom is 100% Latino and Spanish speaking children growing up in the Back of the Yards neighborhood. They often wrestle with the notion that to succeed in the United States they must adapt by erasing their language and culture. However, it’s our hope that students come away with an understanding that their success is rooted in empowering identity through the research of numerous Latin American indigenous groups/civilizations prior to the Pre-Columbian Era. 

The unit centered around the issues of exploited labor and slavery carried over from Latin America’s colonial history. After independence, many countries continued to struggle with the systems that were put in place, leading to many conflicts like the Mexican Revolution. Within the United States, Latino labor issues led to events like the Bracero Movement and Operation Wetback. Labor continues to be a contentious issue in today’s politics, especially when it revolves around immigration. 

Project Title: Latino Heritage through the Arts

2. Big Idea: Rooting My Identity By Exploring My Roots: Exploring Modern Systems of Labor Rooted in Colonization

3. Inquiry:How can we use art to connect past events in Latino history to issues we face today?

4. Grade Level: 4th

5. Academic Subject(s): Literature & Social Studies

6. Artistic Discipline(s): Collage: 2-D, 3-D, Drawing, Painting, Clay

7. How many years have you worked together as partners?: 4years

8. Please describe what you did and what you made for this project:

Through art, literature, music, history (etc) and intense discussions, our students’ researched different cultures from Mexico or Latin America and it’s contribution/importance to American society. We investigated how Latinos here in the U.S. became an important fixture and how we have always played a pivotal role in America’s labor industry: Past, Present and Future.

We asked students to examine how closely events of the past mirror what they observe today in their own communities. Students identified key moments of history that they connected with and rendered these events in ceramics, painting, and words.

Juan-Carlos and I have developed a set of mini-series art workshops focusing on various Latino artists such as: Luis Perez Meza, Susana Baca, Frida Khalo and ceramic art from a variety of Mexican indigenous groups. Over the course of several weeks, I worked with students in the Spanish literacy contents and introduced them to various artists and tools each used. Juan-Carlos then guided students to create their own artwork using the techniques and styles of the artists studied. 

They specifically looked at different pre-colonial and modern artifact made from clay. Students looked at the art from the Mayan, Aztecs, Incas as well as from indigenous groups in Latin America such as:*****

ART

They learn about artists’ creative process, technique and materials or writings. Students used these artists’ creative style/process and used it as a template to create work based on their Latin American culture.

Our students looked at different pre-colonial pottery/ceramics of these people/tribes. Students created ceramic artifacts representing or inspired from their research using methods/techniques in ceramics from early pre-colonial civilizations in Mexico (or Latin America). Students created collage works on wood that encompass writings, reflections, lyrics, ceramic artifacts and drawings from the variety of themes they studied. Students chose artifacts (fragments of writings, lyrics,) that resonated with them. 

They learn about artists’ (indigenous people, musicians, songwriters, etc.) creative process, technique and materials or writings. Students used these artists’ creative style/process and used it as a template to create work based on their Latin American culture.

Students learned some basic clay techniques and created artifacts representing or inspired from their research using methods/techniques in clay making such as: coils, slips, and l***

Music Writing As A Historical Document

Students researched a style of Mexican songs called “Corridas” that contained lyrics that described the work of the Mexican farmer “ranchero”. They learned about the indigenous laborer in Mexico and the hard work, mistreatment, exploitation and class discrimination induced to them by the Mexican Government. It’s separation of economic systems of class that lead to a revolt and inspired the Mexican revolution. Students also made connections to The National Farm Workers Union (United Farms Workers Union) lead by Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta here in U.S. This prompted a side conversation on the music of Susan Baca who sings about slavery, racism and some of injustices women of color faced.

Students took a deeper look at the rough relationship between Mexico & United States and how the saying “ We Didn’t Cross the Border, the Border Crossed Us” came to be. Our students will also look at how this American & Mexican relationship led to an labor agreement that imported Mexicans (or Latinos) into the United States that began the “Bracero” working program here in the U.S.

Students also looked at artists such as Frida Khalo, Luis Perez Meza, Susanna Baca.

They learn about artists’ creative process, technique and materials or writings. Students used these artists’ creative style/process and used it as a template to create work based on their Latin American culture.

They specifically looked at different pre-colonial pottery/ceramics of these people/tribes. Students created ceramic artifacts representing or inspired from their research using methods/techniques in ceramics from early pre-colonial civilizations in Mexico (or Latin America). Students created collage works on wood that encompass writings, reflections, lyrics, ceramic artifacts and drawings from the variety of themes they studied. Students chose artifacts (fragments of writings, lyrics,) that resonated with them. Students looked at the artwork of Frida Khalo and how she put together fragments of imagery/symbols to create a larger visual. 

9. How did you share your student’s learning process with your school faculty or community?

Teaching Artist Assessment:

How did you assess student arts learning?: (ex. Was it formative or summative? Was it a written, verbal or performative based assessment? Were students provided with teacher or peer feedback? Did you use a rubric or portfolio system? Etc.)

Formative:

Summative:

Verbal:

What were the results of the assessment? What did students learn in your class/project?

What did you learn from analyzing the student assessments that informs your Arts teaching practice?

Illinois Arts Learning Standards Addressed:

Teacher Assessment:

How did you assess student academic content learning?: (ex. Was it formative or summative? Was it a written, verbal or performative based assessment? Were students provided with teacher or peer feedback? Did you use a rubric or portfolio system? Etc.)

What were the results of the assessment? What did students learn in your class/project?

Standards Addressed: (Common Core, Next Generation Science, SEL, Etc.):