Bulb Archived: A/R Partners 2017-2018: Barrera, McDermott, Potratz & Benavides

1. How did you and your teaching partner decide to do this project? (Please describe the context of your project, this can include influence from previous projects, context of your school, community, etc.): 

We all worked together last year on a similar project and we wanted to expand on it. Bringing in another teacher and really spending more time on specific parts of the project.

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2. Big Idea: 

Words as Superpowers 

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3. Inquiry: 

What are our talents and strengths? What are symbols of our talents and strengths?

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4. Grade Level: 

4th grade

5. Academic Subject(s): 

Social Studies 

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6. Artistic Discipline(s): Students explored writing their own poetry, indigenous poetry, images, and symbols, drawing, fashion and performance.

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7. How many years have you worked together as partners?: 

Luis and Julie: 3 years, Arturo: 2 years, and Sheila: 1 year

8. Please describe what you did and what you made for this project: 

Students made their own poems and capes, as well as performed their poems.

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9. What were you hoping the students would learn during this project?: 

We were hoping students would learn more about Mexican and Mayan culture or their own culture, as well as their own talents and strengths.

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10. What surprised you during this project?: 

I was most surprised by the students ability to draw freehand and the quickness with which they took to the poetry/writing.

11. What worked in this project and why? What didn’t work and why?: 

The project as a whole was a success. I can’t really think of anything that didn’t work. I think we could always spend more time writing and reading in class because that’s always something students need to build better skills at.

12. How did you assess student learning?: (ex. Was it formative or summative? Was it a written, verbal or performative based assessment? Were students provided with teacher or peer feedback? Did you use a rubric or portfolio system? Etc.) 

Our Assessment Tools captured information regarding students knowledge of themselves, self awareness and self-worth. As students completed their capes, cape emblem designs, and poetry their collection of poems and their final presentation served as the rubric to measure their success and ability. We payed most attention to aspects of their writing and verbal abilities, as measured by their willingness to share and present their poems in class aloud to the group and in their final performance for the camera/video. Feedback was given throughout the making process, with responses to re-writes and revisions of poems. Drafts were assessed by the instructor for grammar usage, punctuation and spelling. We also assessed students’ ability to project their voice, clarity of speech, audibility, annunciation and energy level for their video performance. These Assessment Tools served the class as we teach poetic devices and “best practices” for reading/performance/presentation or public speaking skills.

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13. How did you share your student’s learning process with others? Who did you share it with?: 

We shared the student’s learning at Convergence with their Capes, written poems and video recordings of their performance. 

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14. Standards Addressed: (Common Core, Next Generation Science, National Core Arts): 

National Coalition for Core Arts Standards

4th VA:Cr1.1.4a Brainstorm multiple approaches to a creative art or design problem.

4th VA:Cr1.2.4a Collaboratively set goals and create artwork that is meaningful and has purpose to the makers.

4th VA:Cr3.1.4a Revise artwork in progress on the basis of insights gained through peer discussion

4th VA:Re.7.2.4a Analyze components in visual imagery that convey messages.

4th VA:Re8.1.4a Interpret art by referring to contextual information and analyzing relevant subject matter, characteristics of form, and use of media

4th VA:Cn10.1.4a Create works of art that reflect community cultural traditions

4th VA:Cn11.1.4a Through observation, infer information about time, place, and culture in which a work of art was created.