Bulb Archived: A/R Partners 2016-2017: Calhoun & Rodrigue

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Students learning the basics of the camera

1. How did you and your teaching partner decide to do this project? (Please describe the context of your project, this can include influence from previous projects, context of your school, community, etc.):

We decided to explore a different subject matter, math, then we had in past years as a challenge to both artist and teacher. Photographing fractions or what less than one looks like in a photograph. The art medium will be mainly photography. We introduced photography by showing students a large scale camera obscura that turned their classroom into a giant camera reflecting their neighborhood inside the classroom. Then students were allowed to explore taking pictures for the first time and based on their initial photographs we created the assessment tool for what makes a successful photograph. From here both teacher and artist explained fractions and camera shutter speeds, so students could understand what the different fractions (shutter speeds) they can do with photography. We started with what slow shutter speed looks like by showing student examples of photos made with slow shutter speeds. From their students started to create images of movement tracings with the classroom lights off. We then moved through the different shutter speeds, going all the way through to one of the fastest shutter speeds, so students could see what high-speed photography looked like. Students then created images of movement and catching their peers jump in the air and leafs being thrown into the sky. Student each picked two final images, one to represent fast shutter speed and one to represent slow shutter speed. 

2. Big Idea:

Photographing Less Than One

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Image created by a student of fast shutter speed
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Photographing with slow shutter spee

3. Inquiry:

What does less than one look like? How can we show parts that equal one whole? 

4. Grade Level:

3rd grade 

5. Academic Subject(s):

Please insert your response here

Math-Developing an Understanding of Fractions as Numbers

6. Artistic Discipline(s):

Photography

7. How many years have you worked together as partners?:

8. Please describe your project:

 We introduced photography by showing students a large scale camera obscura that turned their classroom into a giant camera reflecting their neighborhood inside the classroom. Then students were allowed to explore taking pictures for the first time and based on their initial photographs we created the assessment tool for what makes a successful photograph. From here both teacher and artist explained fractions and camera shutter speeds, so students could understand what the different fractions (shutter speeds) they can do with photography. We started with what slow shutter speed looks like by showing student examples of photos made with slow shutter speeds. From their students started to create images of movement tracings with the classroom lights off. We then moved through the different shutter speeds, going all the way through to one of the fastest shutter speeds, so students could see what high-speed photography looked like. Students then created images of movement and catching their peers jump in the air and leafs being thrown into the sky. Student each picked two final images, one to represent fast shutter speed and one to represent slow shutter speed. 

9. What were you hoping the students would learn during this project?:

We hoped students would learn fractions and understand a camera’s shutter speeds, as well as basic camera functions. 

10. What surprised you during this project?:

How well students grasped the concept of fractions and how they related to the camera. They understood from one class to the next how a slow shutter speed would affect and image and how a fast shutter speed would affect an image. 

11. What worked in this project and why?:

Students actually learned how a camera shutter speed works, something that adults to don’t even normally understand. Students really enjoyed the challenge of figuring out how to create an image to represent a slow shutter speed and a faster shutter speed. The creation of these images also got the students active and moving around. 

12. What didn’t work and why?:

We had initially talked about using glow sticks and doing some light painting, but with the time of day and the challenge of making this work in a classroom around noon time, we improvised instead. 

13. What was your approach to assessment for this project?:

Students created their own assessment tool for the project. Towards the end of the project we reflected on the assessment tool together and decided what should still stay on the tool and what needed to be added or removed. 

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Student created assessment tool

14. How did you share your student’s learning process with others? Who did you share it with?:

Each student has individual photographs that represent the different fractions that can be displayed on an exhibition wall. 

15. Did sharing your students’ learning occur according to your plan for social engagement in your proposal? Why or why not? Please explain.

Yes. Student each had two photographs that are now on display. 

16. How are you as teachers, artists and students social engagers through this work?:

The students engaged with each other to create this work, as they could not work alone on the images as at all. They needed the support of their partner(s) to create the work. 

17. Did sharing your project with others influence how you will approach future projects?:

No. I think we will think more about how the work is displayed in the future, as we enjoyed the process of giving our input on how we place the work in an exhibition for sharing the work. 

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18. Standards Addressed: (Common Core, Next Generation Science, National Core Arts):

CCSS: Number and Operations—Fractions 3.NF

Develop understanding of fractions as numbers.

1. Understand a fraction 1/b as the quantity formed by 1 part when a whole is partitioned into b equal parts; understand a fraction a/b as the quantity formed by a parts of size 1/b.

3. Explain equivalence of fractions in special cases, and compare fractions by reasoning about their size.

a. Understand two fractions as equivalent (equal) if they are the same size, or the same point on a number line.

d. Compare two fractions with the same numerator or the same denominator by reasoning about their size. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, or <, and justify the conclusions, e.g., by using a visual fraction model.